People @ SUNY Oswego

Meet Some of the Students and Faculty

HCI Faculty

There are three permanent graduate faculty in the Department of Computer Science who predominatly run the HCI masters program. However, many other seminars, electives and courses that our students can take are offered in multiple departments by an number of diverse faculty.

Damian Schofield

Damian Schofield

Damian is currently the Director of Human Computer Interaction (Full Professor) at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Oswego, a position he has held since November 2009. He also currently Adjunct Associate Professor of Forensic Computing at Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia. Prior to his move to America, Damian held the position of the Associate Professor of Computer Games and Digital Media, in the School of Creative Media at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia. Before his move out to Australia, he was a Lecturer in the School of Computer Science at the University of Nottingham, UK. Damian also remains a director and major shareholder of Aims Solutions Ltd., a UK based company created in 2000, to provide computer graphics visualization services and virtual reality based simulation training products to a wide range of public and private sector organizations.

Damian has been involved in research examining the use of digital evidence in courtrooms, particularly virtual reconstructions (using computer games/graphics technology), for nearly 20 years. He is specifically interested in the representation and understanding of visual evidentiary information in the courtroom environment. Damian is regularly used as an expert witness in courts all over the world and has worked on many high profile cases and acted as a consultant for the FBI. Recently, he has tended to work on whatever research projects his students think up - he is currently very interested in robot theater productions, augmented reality surgery and the possibilities of geospatial media.

You can learn more about Damian and his work here.

Caglar Yildirim

Caglar Yildirim

Caglar is currently an Assistant Professor of Human Computer Interaction at State University of New York at Oswego, where he mainly teaches graduate courses in the HCI Master's program.

Caglar holds a PhD in Human Computer Interaction, with a PhD minor in Cognitive Psychology, from Iowa State University (ISU). While pursuing his graduate studies, Caglar worked as a graduate teaching assistant in the Virtual Reality Applications Center at ISU, where he supported various HCI graduate courses and worked with graduate students. He also taught core courses in the HCI graduate program at ISU. Broadly speaking, Caglar's research interests concern how information and communication technologies (ICTs) affect human cognition, behavior, and well-being, as well as how ICTs can be utilized to support and promote human cognition, positive behavioral change, and well-being. Caglar's research agenda incorporates an interdisciplinary approach to conducting basic and applied research at the intersection of HCI, cognitive psychology, and mental health. He is currently looking into how mobile technologies and virtual reality applications can be utilized to support and promote human cognition, positive behavioral change, and well-being. His previous research on nomophobia, or no-mobile-phone phobia, which could be defined as smartphone separation anxiety, has been featured in various media channels in the US, including, among others, Today Show, Washington Post, Huffington Post, and Fox News.

You can learn more about Caglar and his work here.

Jae Woong Lee

Jae Woong Lee

Jae is predominantly a Computer Scientist, he earned a Ph.D. and an M.S. in Computer Engineering, and a B.S. in Computer Science. His main research focuses on Modeling and Simulation of human activities and smart spaces, developing Health Informatics and Intelligent Healthcare Systems - in particular for the elderly and people who are suffering chronical diseases.

Since his research has focused on the smart spaces which are installed by advanced assistive and interactive systems, he has long worked in other related areas such as Activity Recognition, Context Awareness Computing and Human Computer Interaction (HCI). Since his Ph.D., he has been the main contributor in the development of a human activity simulator, called Persim, and is still participating in the project. Jae's research interests span Human-Centric Environments, Mobile Health, Data Analytics and Data Science, and he is recently working in analyzing many human activities by utilizing statistical methods.

Jae is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor of Computer Science at SUNY Oswego. He teaches Statistical Methods for HCI Research, Information Retrieval, and Systems Programming. Jae also leads graduate seminars, HCI projects, and Software Engineering (SE) projects for undergraduate and graduate students in computer science and and HCI. Prior to joining the faculty at SUNY Oswego, he was an Assistant Professor in the School of Computer Science and Mathematics, University of Central Missouri and taught Operating Systems, Database Theories and Applications, Algorithms and Data Structures.


Students Who Came Back

Bastian Tenbergen

Bastian Tenbergen

Bastian studied Cognitive Science at the University of Osnabruck, Germany, where he obtained a Bachelor of Science degree. Part of Bastian's degree requirement was a semester abroad, which he spent here at Oswego State. During that time, Bastian developed a keen interest in Machine Learning, working closely with Prof. David Vampola, as well as Human Computer Interaction, working with Human Computer Interaction program founder Prof. Gary Klatsky.

After his graduation in Germany, Bastian came back to Oswego to study in the HCI MA program. During his graduate studies, Bastian worked closely with a number of faculty on immersive virtual environments, pen-based computer interfaces, and software engineering methodology. After he completed his Master's degree, Bastian went back to Germany to pursue a PhD in Software Engineering with a specialization on Model-based Requirements Engineering at the University of Duisburg-Essen. During that time, Bastian worked closely with partners from industry and academia on requirements engineering for software-intensive, safety-critical systems in several publically funded projects.

In 2015, Bastian returned to Oswego yet again, this time as an Assistant Professor for Computer Science. He mainly researches and teaches courses in software engineering, focusing on software quality in early stages of development, model-based representations for embedded and cyber physical software.

Dan Schlegel

Dan Schlegel

Dan studied computer science at SUNY Oswego where he graduated from the college honors program. After receiving his bachelor's degree, Dan completed the MA program in Human Computer Interaction at Oswego. During his time in Oswego, Dan worked on several research projects including an application of neural nets to computer file organization, and a tablet PC application for teaching concurrent programming.

Dan went on to receive his PhD from the University at Buffalo (UB) where he studied issues in knowledge representation and reasoning along with natural language understanding. He has implemented and maintains the open-source CSNePS knowledge representation and reasoning system. Dan is also a graduate of the PhD Track in Cognitive Science. After receiving his PhD Dan became a postdoc in the Department of Biomedical Informatics at UB where he helped to design systems for automatic understanding of biomedical text. He was also an NCI/VA fellow for a time in the Big Data-Scientist Training Enhancement Program (BD-STEP).

In the spring semester of 2017 Dan returned to Oswego as a Visiting Assistant Professor and will continue as an Assistant Professor beginning in the fall 2017 semester. He is currently teaching courses on programming languages and the foundations of computer science. His research continues to focus on automated logical reasoning systems and automated understanding of natural language text.